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The Common Types of Wood Every Designer Needs to Know About

Trees have been an integral part of civilization development. Varying types of wood have been used throughout history since the early Paleolithic times to manufacture tools, furniture, weapons, and of course, erect buildings. Since early human civilization, the use of wood has depended on availability, quality, and cost.

Wood is second to stone in regard to its application in the construction world. It’s widely preferred when it comes to building shelters, houses, and boats. Its chemical properties are complex, but regardless, we have successfully harnessed its distinct features to build an array of composite structures.

In this read, we are going to take a closer look at the common types of wood every designer should know about.

  1. Teakwood

Teakwood is one of the widely used hardwoods. It’s yellow to dark brown and extremely strong, durable, heavy, warp-resistant, weather-resistant and doesn’t rot. It contains natural oils that make the wood pest-resistant and does not burn easily. Compared to other types of wood, teak is quite expensive, but it’s one of the most preferred for furniture.

Uses:

Teakwood is commonly used to build framed houses, windows, doors, and partitions. It is also great for outdoor furniture like lounge chairs and garden benches. It’s also used to produce veneer.

  1. Mahogany

Also referred to as Honduras, mahogany is a reddish-brown, strong wood with a uniform pore structure. It is a great carving wood and finishes. It handles stain extremely well, rending an excellent finish to furniture pieces. One of the best things about mahogany is that it does not swell, shrink or warp. It can also be used underwater.

Uses:
Honduras is commonly used to build dining table sets, nested tables, fashion cabinets, etc. It’s also used to build window frames, veneers, window frames, and even boats.

  1. Cedar Wood

This is a knotty softwood with a red-brown color and light lines. It is a softwood, but not as soft as its counterparts. It’s aromatic in nature and has a uniform texture. Like teakwood, cedarwood is highly resistant to insects and decay.

Uses:

Cedarwood is one of the popular materials for lining drawers, boxes, and chests. Storage closets and simple cases are also made from cedar.

  1. Oak Wood

This is another popular type of hardwood. Oakwood is usually distinguished into red and white varieties. The red type is also called black oak and has a distinct finish and grain in addition to its heavy and robust properties. Oakwood is also resistant to fungus, moisture and yeast.

Uses:

Oakwood is a great pick for office and household furniture, such as cabinets and bookshelves. Also, it’s widely preferred for outdoor furniture. It’s widely used in the ship and boat construction industry due to its moisture-resistant feature. Nowadays, interior designers are using oak for flooring, veneer production, and wood-framed structures.

  1. Pine Wood

This is a soft, light yellow or white wood that’s straight-grained and light in weight. Pinewood is resistant to swelling, warping and shrinking, but it is easy to stain and shape. It grows in most parts of the Nothern Hemisphere, and its biggest flaw is that it decays easily when it comes into contact with soil.

Uses:

Pinewood is used to make all sorts of outdoor and indoor furniture pieces. It’s also used to make widow and door frames, paving materials and flooring. Knotty pine is usually used for decoration purposes, and it’s also a source of turpentine.

Conclusion

This is not a comprehensive list of the common woods out there, but it covers the most important when in the construction and design industry. If you are a designer, it’s important to do your homework and learn about every type of wood used in construction out there.


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